Tasting an almighty trinity from Teeling whiskey: Teeling 24 year old single malt, 17 year old single malt and Stout Cask

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Three samples of Teeling whiskey arrive at Maltmileage headquarters

Three samples of the lastest limited release small batch Teeling whiskies from Ireland have made their way to maltmileage headquarters in Melbourne: Teeling 24 year old single malt, Teeling 17 year old single malt Jim Barry Shiraz Cask Collaboration, and Teeling whiskey stout cask collaboration with Galway Bay brewery. Now, with three whiskey glasses sitting ready, it is time to taste these whiskies from the Emerald Isle.  Continue reading “Tasting an almighty trinity from Teeling whiskey: Teeling 24 year old single malt, 17 year old single malt and Stout Cask”

Hyde No. 6 (Cask Strength)

Type: Single malt whiskey

Origin: Ireland 🇨🇮

ABV: N/A (Cask strength)

Malt Mileage rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

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Hyde No. 4 Rum Finish

Type: Single malt whiskey

Origin: Ireland 🇨🇮

ABV: 46%

Malt Mileage rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Reaction😊

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Hyde No 3 The Aras Cask Single Grain

Type: Grain whiskey

Origin: Ireland 🇨🇮

ABV: 46%

Malt Mileage rating: ⭐⭐⭐

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Bushmills 21 year old

Type: Single malt whiskey

Origin: Ireland 

ABV: 40% 

Malt Mileage rating: stars 4.5

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Tullamore Dew 12 year old Special Reserve

Type: Blended whiskey 

Origin: Ireland 

ABV: 40% 

Malt Mileage rating: stars 4

Reaction: 😀
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Jameson Caskmates

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Rating: ★★★★

Recommendation: Buy it

Type: Irish whiskey

Origin: Ireland

ABV: 40%

Reaction: 🙂

During the course of my whiskey journey I have made the acquaintance of a number of delicious drams, but few brands can boast the consistent quality and excellent value of Jameson.

An Irish whiskey, Jameson is distilled three times (as opposed to Scotch whisky, which tends to be distilled twice). This means that after Jameson distills its “wash” (similar to a strong beer made from malted and unmalted barley), it repeats the process twice; distilling the spirit two further times. This means that the spirit is likely to be smoother and cleaner than whisky which is distilled twice; depending of course on distillation cuts. That does not make it better, as fans of heavy Scotch malts will attest, just characteristically smooth and clean. This happens because the more a whisk(e)y is distilled, the more of the flavours from its raw materials (i.e: barley and that “beer” known as a “wash” in the industry) are stripped away. When Jameson finally finishes its three distillations, the spirit is very high and usually between 80 and 85% alcohol by volume. 

Jameson add water to this nice clean spirit and reduce its alcohol volume to between 60 and 70% alcohol by volume. Then, this diluted spirit is placed into barrels; traditionally sherry butts, bourbon barrels and port pipes. This means that the spirit begins to become infused with flavours from the barrels as it ages in the barrels.

Caskmates adds an interesting twist to this method of whiskey making by maturing Jameson whiskey in Jameson barrels that have been seasoned with stout; that blackest of beers. So, in theory, this should add to the classic Jameson flavour profile notes of coffee, bitter hops and dark chocolate. 

Nose:

Luscious layers of cream sit beneath powdery Turkish coffee, cocoa, port, sticky caramels and dark chocolate. The bouquet is sweet and inviting. 

Taste:

Sweet sherry and port is followed by dark chocolate, alcohol preserved cherries and sweetened coffee. The mouth feel is rich and creamy. Butterscotch and caramel teases the palate. 

Finish:

As the sweetness of the sherry and port fades, the taste of the stout emerges – heavy roasted coffee and cocoa notes, which are a seamless shift from the taste of the port, carry the bitter taste of hops; something lovers of India Pale Ale or hop rich beers will appreciate. 

Bottom line:

Buy it. Jameson Caskmates combines two of my favourite things into one bottle: whiskey and hoppy beer. My taste buds detect lots of port and sherry, coffee, dark chocolate and hops. Mix Jameson Caskmates with your favourite beer, preferably hoppy, to make a delicious boilermaker or sip it neat. I cancelled my plans tonight; the allure of this Irish beauty and Netflix was too great. 

Teeling Single Grain Irish Whiskey

Rating★★★

Type: Whiskey

Origin: Ireland

ABV: 46%

Reaction: 🙂

Teeling single grain Irish whiskey is made predominately from maize/corn and then distilled using column distillation. Once distilled it is fully matured in Californian Cabernet Sauvignon wine barrels, now that is something novel and interesting! I tip my hat to you, Teeling. 

Nose:

On the nose there is lots of twisted orange peel, dusty corn flour, date scone, dried fig, spice and brown vinegar.

Taste:

On the palate the whiskey is very smooth and sweet, with the snap of sweet ethanol and a vodka-like pinch. The ethanols are a little more pronounced than what I like, but orange peel seems to be the central theme and it almost tastes like a whisky based cocktail with an orange citrus twist. Also find spice, pepper, wood, nutmeg and caramel.

Finish:

On the finish the wood lingers with hints of spice, yogurt coated cranberry, dried dates, anise seed, icy cold schnapps, and caramel.

Bottom line:

Buy it, if you want to try a single grain Irish whiskey that is smooth, sweet and quaffable. Teeling Single Grain Irish Whiskey seems to be dominated by the ethanol in the spirit, which gives the whiskey a vodka-like character that underpins much of the other flavours, but it went down a treat. 

Green Spot Pot Still Irish Whiskey

Green-Spot

Rating: ★★★★

Type: Whiskey

Origin: Ireland

ABV: 40%

Reaction: 🙂

With St Patrick’s Day fast approaching it seems fitting to embark on an Irish whiskey tasting journey until the big day. In 2015 St Patrick’s Day falls on 17 March 2015, and that day is dedicated to a Catholic saint who famously explained the confusing concept of the Holy Trinity using a three leaf clover (the shamrock) in Ireland. The Holy Trinity, in Catholic teaching, is the idea that God is in three persons or beings – the Father, the holy spirit and the son (Jesus). As over a decade of Catholic education has made clear, this concept is far from simple so to ease the cognitive pressure let us skip the dogma and move onto another divine creation – Irish whiskey!

There are three things that make most Irish whiskey distinctly Irish. First, it tends to be distilled three times (as opposed to twice, as most Scotch whisky). Second, it tends to be made from malted and unmalted barley (as opposed to being made purely from malted barley, as most Scotch whisky). Third, the Irish spell whiskey with an “e” whereas the Scots spell whisky without the e. Now that, my whisk(e)y brethren, is the Holy Trinity of Irish whiskey.  

On this lead up to St Patrick’s Day 2015 the first Irish whiskey to be tasted by Malt Mileage is Green Spot. Green spot is a pot still whiskey that has been distilled three times,  is made from malted and unmalted barley and the word whiskey on the bottle is spelt with an “e”! It even has the word “green” in the name, which, though probably a reference to the use of unmalted barley, is nonetheless a tribute to the Emerald Isle. You cannot get any more Irish than that, unless of course the bottle comes with a beard redder than mine.

Green spot is matured in American bourbon and sherry barrels. 

Nose:

The aroma of bubblegum, green apple soft candy, peach, apricot and whipped cream is first noticeable, followed by honey, cereal and barley, crushed nuts, pecan, vanillas, dew, green strawberries, burnt chocolate brownie, caramel, treated wood and nutty Flaxseed.

Taste

On the palate this whiskey is full bodied and spicy, the wood takes hold and is counterbalanced by the sweetness of green pear, nectarine and mango. The fruit is sharp yet sugary and sticky. Honey and caramels then emerge, as the spices tingle on the palate.

Finish:

The spice remains on the palate with the wood, accompanied by pear and apple core.

Bottom line:       

Buy it. Green Spot is a superbly crafted Irish whiskey that I would have no hesitation buying at its price. It is a full flavoured spicy whiskey with lots of Irish charm.